Fiction Fest: Last free look at Lisa Rumsey Harris’ ‘Treasure Blume’

Unlikely Gift of Treasure Blume-web2x3As April’s Fiction Fest sneak peeks wind down, take solace in knowing that May’s books will be in the mix starting this Friday, May 3!

Before we close the book on April’s posts, let’s take one more look at Lisa Rumsey Harris’ “The Unlikely Gift of Treasure Blume,” which is available in bookstores and on BooksAndThings.com, Amazon.com and BarnesAndNoble.com.

EXCERPT:

“Thanks for the advice,” he said, slamming down a tray of tacos on the table. He really didn’t want to talk with Grammy Blume anymore, but he couldn’t stop himself from speaking. He slumped into a chair and looked at his hands. “I’m having a hard time without her. But with her doesn’twork either. I don’t think I can take the pain of watching her get kicked in the teeth daily. Not on top of the pain I’m already feeling. I don’t want any more pain.”

Grammy sat down at the table. “Of course you’re afraid of pain. Everyone is. Men more than women. But that’s not what Treasure brings to you, and you know it.”

Dennis put the heels of his hand over his eyes. “You just don’t get it. This relationship with her, it’s just so complicated. Why does love have to hurt?” he asked.

“Folks have been asking that old question as long as they’ve been picking their noses. And I don’t have an answer for you,” said Grammy. “But I can tell you this. Beauty, love, and pain. They’re all tied up together.” She gazed out the kitchen window. “It isn’t hard to find beauty in somethingbeautiful. Anyone can find beauty in Hawaii, looking out over ocean sunsets and sandy beaches. But not everyone can find beauty here, in sagebrush and June grass and heat and desert.”

Dennis had no idea what the old lady was talking about. He wished she would go away.

“But Treasure does,” Grammy continued. “It’s who she is. She finds beauty in everything””in balding cats, and throwaway children, and saggy old women in spandex.”

Dennis caught on and smiled involuntarily. “In old laxative bottles and scratchy quilts?”

“Yes,” said Grammy, nodding. “And in a well-plated school lunch too.” Dennis moved his hands and reached out to straighten the tray of tacos. “Hidden beauty longs to be recognized and praised. And that’s what Treasure does. It’s why she’s done so well with that class of hers. Why, I bet you money that if you take her anywhere in the world, she’d be able to find the beauty.”

Dennis considered Grammy’s words, toying with a taco as she spoke.

Grammy was still looking out the window. He didn’t say anything. “That’s her real gift. You just watch her and see what she brings back to life around her. She brought me back. I was an ornery old woman who had given up on life. Never left my recliner if I could help it. But she worked a resurrection on me. I wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for Treasure Blume.”

Dennis cleared his throat. “But that was you. You’re family. I . . . I walked out on her. When she said it wouldn’t work, I agreed with her. Then I left.”

Grammy whipped her head around and met his gaze. “Sometimes, boy, I fear you are so dumb you might try to milk a duck. Try walking back in. She’ll let you. She loves you””I know she does. She knew you weren’t coping, just because of Micaela. That’s why she asked me to call you and set up a dance lesson.”

“She did this?” asked Dennis, cocking his head to the side.

Grammy nodded. “Her idea. She wouldn’t want to see any of you hurting this way. Walk back in, and she’ll help you find the beauty in where you are.”